jollijeep ni mang lirio 1
Mang Lirio’s Jollijeep

I’m standing in line with some of my coworkers in front of a food stall. It resembles an oversized tin box, with one side displaying a bevy of foods either in microwaveable containers or in plastic bags. Inside the stall, the gas stoves work overtime to keep the supply of newly cooked food up with the barrage of orders.

It’s a weekday noon, and it’s business as usual in Mang Lirio’s “Jollijeep.” I ask for my orders and the amiable store owner, who previously worked as a chef, places them in a takeaway carton and disposable containers and place them in a paper bag. As soon as my coworkers and I have paid for our orders, we leave the crowd and return to the office to eat.

Another Jollijeep that sells pork chop
A Jollijeep that sells pork chop

Ever since I started my current work, one of the things I’ve been really looking forward to is lunch hour, where I get to sample Mang Lirio’s dishes, as well as those from nearby Jollijeeps in Legaspi Village. Sort of a cross between a turo-turo and a food truck, Jollijeep is the informal term for a mobile food stall commonly found in the streets of Makati’s Central Business District. These stalls cater mainly to the workforce in the neighborhood, and the menu varies between each Jollijeep, but common items are the typical Filipino ulam.

One of the most popular is the Jollijeep in Rada Street selling what has been described in social media circles as the best sisig in Makati. It does taste great and it’s cheap, but the serving is bitin compared to the rice it’s served with.

"Sisig Sa Rada" Jollijeep
“Sisig Sa Rada” Jollijeep

Sisig Sa Rada (PHP 50 with rice)
Sisig Sa Rada (PHP 50 with rice)

On the street where our office is, Mang Lirio’s Jollijeep stands out by offering nicely packaged items, and while the taste can be bland at times, the fact that the food is affordable and different from the usual fare is enough reason for me and my coworkers to repeatedly visit, especially when budget is tight. Rice meals would consist of a main ulam, a vegetable side dish and a serving of rice; and would cost between PHP 70 and PHP 80, depending on the ulam.

Fish Fillet with Tartar Sauce; Buttered Corn, Carrots and Peas (PHP 70 with rice)
Fish Fillet with Tartar Sauce; Buttered Corn, Carrots and Peas (PHP 70 with rice)
Roast Beef with Gravy; Mashed Potato (PHP 80)
Roast Beef with Gravy; Mashed Potato (PHP 80 with rice)
Dinuguan; Pinakbet (PHP 80)
Dinuguan; Pinakbet (PHP 80 with rice)
Lumpiang Shanghai (PHP 70 with rice)
Lumpiang Shanghai (PHP 70 with rice)

Mang Lirio also serves non-rice meals, though these may not be filling enough for lunch, and are best suited for mid-morning or afternoon breaks. An exception is the personal favorite German Potato Salad, which, while in need of a little bit more salt, can be lunch in itself if you’re not really hungry.

German Potato Salad (PHP 30)
German Potato Salad (PHP 30)
Spaghetti with Meatball (PHP 30)
Spaghetti with Meatball and pan de sal (PHP 40)
Tokwa (PHP 30)
Tokwa (PHP 30)
Siomai (PHP 30)
Siomai (PHP 30)

Mang Lirio’s
C. Palanca Street,
Legaspi Village, Makati City
(in front of The Plantation)

“Stall selling pork chop”
C. Palanca Street,
Legaspi Village, Makati City
(near Mini-Stop)

Sisig Sa Rada
Rada Street,
Legaspi Village, Makati City
(in front of the parking lot, near 7-11)

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